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Fund raiser for libraryIt was the brainchild of Mona Orange and Martha Horsfall. While swimming laps in the pool at Health Nutz one day, Horsfall and Orange exchanged ideas about the annual event for members of the Friends of the Library.

“I suggested we have a thrift shop fashion show,” said Orange. “Martha and I laughed and kept laughing until we realized it was a pretty good idea.” They brought it up to the committee and everyone jumped on board.

The idea was to get at least 10 models to show off outfits, including accessories, they purchased from area thrift shops, yard or estate sales. It developed into a practical showcase for recycling and frugality. The Salvation Army may not be Saks Fifth Avenue, but with a little creativity and some savvy fashion know-how, no one would know the difference.

They gathered 18 willing models who went out shopping for various types of clothing ensembles for men, women, children and teens. No one was able to tell the difference between the store-bought items and those that were secondhand. All the clothing was well-coordinated and looked brand new.

Some purchased clothing items sit in the back of the closet and never sees the light of day, or may be worn only once before being consigned or donated. Most of the clothing is in good condition and in some cases may be brand new. Thrift shopping is a great way to find designer labels, as some of the models discovered.

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Radar gunA familiar scenario: You’re driving along the highways and byways of Fluvanna County – perhaps in a hurry, perhaps just not paying attention – and you suddenly see those flashing blue lights in the rearview mirror.

According to statistics provided by the Fluvanna County Sheriff’s Office (FCSO), deputies made 2,995 traffic stops between Aug. 1, 2016, and Aug. 1, 2017, and issued 903 traffic summonses. Of those, 476 were for speeding, 66 were for reckless driving, and 12 were reckless driving at 20 miles per hour (mph) or more over the posted limit. Deputies also made 74 arrests for driving while intoxicated.

Capt. David Wells of the FCSO said the overall goal of traffic enforcement is safety. “We try to focus on needs-based enforcement,” he said. “We target locations that either generated traffic-related complaints [or] an area that may be prone to motor vehicle crashes.”

Deputies responded to 473 crashes since August 2016, and three people were killed in a head-on collision with a tractor-trailer on Route 15 in late January, but the emphasis on the most trouble-prone areas has helped improve overall safety. Earlier this year the county was recognized by the Department of Motor Vehicles for having zero traffic fatalities in 2016.  Add a comment

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Reserve deputiesHundreds of residents joined first responders at Pleasant Grove on Tuesday (Aug. 1) for Fluvanna County’s Second Annual National Night Out. Featuring a “bike rodeo” course, a cornhole toss, a bounce-house, a “family fun run,” sno-cones and music, it was a great way to pass a summer evening – but it was also a way to build community between citizens and law enforcement.

Building bridges is more important now than ever as public confidence in law enforcement has dropped to near-record lows in recent years. From national controversies like the police shooting that sparked riots in Ferguson, Mo., to the local debate over the teargassing of protesters in Charlottesville after the Ku Klux Klan rally last month, the perception that the police are working against the people has eroded trust in law enforcement.

Even in the best of times, people tend to only come in contact with the police in moments of stress. First held in 1984, National Night Out was designed to give the public and law enforcement a space where they could relax and connect without stress.
“This shows that we are actually human beings,” Fluvanna County Sheriff’s Office Capt. Von Hill told Charlottesville Newsplex. “We’re doing jobs that ordinary people are doing.” Add a comment

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Frances HillFrancis Hill, 92, sat outside on her swing waiting for me to arrive.

She is bright and full of life. In spite of having to use a cane because she can’t trust her left knee not to give out, she looks far younger than her age. She and her husband live with their grandson in Bremo Bluff.

How long have you lived in Fluvanna?
All my life. I was born here. I started school at [age] 7. West Bottom. I had to walk three miles every day rain or shine. My grandma wouldn’t let me stay at home. My grandma raised me. I never knew my mother. She died when I was a baby. My father’s mother raised me. My father’s name is George Armstrong. My mother’s name was Margaret.

Tell me about your family.
I had 11 children; six boys and five girls…I didn’t go to the hospital for any of them. Miss Murry Scott was my midwife. My husband, Bennie Hill, Sr., worked at Farmington Country Club. I don’t know what he did there. At one time I think he worked construction. My kids live all over. Some in New Jersey. Some in Atlanta.  One lives in Short Pump.
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Football may be the fall sport that attracts the most attention, but it is not the only sport that athletes compete in very seriously from August until November. The Flying Flucos of Fluvanna County High School field teams in volleyball (girls only), cross county (boys and girls), golf (mostly boys, but girls have been on the team) and competition cheer (girls only).

The Fluco volleyball team under Coach Christi Harlowe-Garrett has a history of success. Several Fluco volleyball players have gone on to play at the college level.  Last season was a bit of an off year as the team came in at 12-12, but the team’s games are always fast-moving and enjoyable to watch.

High school volleyball is now played with a point scored on every serve and the serve changing sides whenever the serving team loses the point. Games are played to 25 points, win by two, and a match is played until one team wins three games. If the first four games are split, necessitating a fifth game, that final contest is played to 15 points, win by two.

The volleyball season opens Aug. 12 with a match against Rockbridge High School. The Flucos’ first home match is Aug. 17 against Waynesboro High. On Aug. 22 the Flucos travel to Broadway High. On Sept. 5 they start a strenuous run of competitions against the schools that make up what has always been known as the Jefferson District. In September they play Monticello High, Albemarle High, Louisa County High, Orange County High, Charlottesville High and Powhatan High in that order.

Cross country is also a sport in which the Flucos have had some continuing success. The girls’ team under Coach Rose Brogan usually boasts a host of runners. Brogan said that returning from the top seven last year are seniors Saige Haney and Niva Hoffman, junior Brianna Parker and sophomores Shae Jonkman, Hattie Lintecum and McKenzie Morris. Last year the team finished fourth in the Conference and sent two runners to the State meet.    Add a comment

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